Coaching for Leaders

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Rating
4.8
from
1086 reviews
This podcast has
586 episodes
Language
Publisher
Explicit
No
Date created
2011/08/20
Last published
2022/06/27
Average duration
38 min.
Release period
7 days

Description

Leaders aren't born, they're made. This Monday show helps you discover leadership wisdom through insightful conversations. Independently produced weekly since 2011, Dr. Dave Stachowiak brings perspective from a thriving, global leadership academy, plus more than 15 years of leadership at Dale Carnegie. Bestselling authors, expert researchers, deep conversation, and regular dialogue with listeners have attracted 25 million downloads and the #1 search result for management on Apple Podcasts. Activate your FREE membership to search the entire episode library by topic at CoachingforLeaders.com

Podcast episodes

Check latest episodes from Coaching for Leaders podcast

How to Involve Stakeholders in Decisions, with Eric Pliner
2022/06/27
Eric Pliner: Difficult Decisions Eric Pliner is chief executive officer of YSC Consulting. He has designed and implemented leadership strategy in partnership with some of the world’s best-known CEOs and organizations. Eric’s writing has been featured in Harvard Business Review, Fortune, Forbes, and Fast Company. A member of the Dramatists’ Guild of America, Eric is co-author of the U.S. National Standards for Health Education and Spooky Dog & the Teen-Age Gang Mysteries (with Amy Rhodes), an Off-Broadway theatrical parody of television cartoons for adults. He is a board director with Hip Hop Public Health. He is also the author of Difficult Decisions: How Leaders Make the Right Call with Insight, Integrity, and Empathy*. In this conversation, Eric and I discuss the difficult and sometimes awkward moments when we engage other stakeholders in our decisions. We explore the language to use when discussing a stakeholder’s role in a decision. Plus, Eric details how to establish clear expectations about involvement in decisions to avoid sending messages that we otherwise don’t intend. Key Points Clarify who you will engage and how you intend to do so. Before discussing a decision with a stakeholder, explain how the decision is going to be made. Make it clear if you’re offering them a views, a voice, a vote, or a veto. Standardize your individual and team processes for decision-making. Ask the stakeholder for input — and go deeper with a second or third question to appreciate what’s behind what they’ve said. Remind stakeholders how the decision will be made when you conclude. Don’t underestimated the importance of this step. Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Influence Many Stakeholders, with Andy Kaufman (episode 240) How to Deal with Opponents and Adversaries, with Peter Block (episode 328) The Way to Make Better Decisions, with Annie Duke (episode 499) Handling a Difficult Stakeholder, with Nick Timiraos (episode 581) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
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How Top Leaders Influence Great Teamwork, with Scott Keller
2022/06/20
Scott Keller: CEO Excellence Scott is a senior partner in McKinsey’s Southern California office. He co-leads the firm’s global CEO Excellence service line and is the author of six books, including the bestseller Beyond Performance. Scott spent his early consulting years working on business strategy and operational topics until his life was turned upside down when his second child was born with profound special needs. After taking time off to attend to his family, Scott returned to McKinsey with the desire to bring the best of psychology, social science, and the study of human potential into the workplace. He is a cofounder of Digital Divide Data and one of a few hundred people in history known to have traveled to every country in the world. His most recent book written with Carolyn Dewar and Vikram Malhotra is titled CEO Excellence: The Six Mindsets That Distinguish the Best Leaders from the Rest*. In this conversation, Scott and I examine McKinsey’s research on what the top CEOs do (and avoid) when building great teams. We look at a few of the key mindsets that the best CEOs bring to their organizations — and how teamwork plays into this. Plus, we explore some of the key questions top leaders should ask when determining if it’s time to exit someone from the team. Key Points Top leaders staff for both aptitude and attitude. The have an eye to both the short and long term. The most successful CEOs have a mindset of “first team” and expect leaders in the organization to prioritize serving the whole team/organization over any functional area. New CEOs are often known for acting quickly on staffing, but the most successful leaders also temper this with fairness. They use the four questions below to act with both fairness and speed. Top leaders stay connected with people throughout the organization, but also keep some distance. There’s a key distinction between being friendly and making friends. The best CEO’s ensure that they have positively addressed all four questions below before removing somebody: Does the team member know exactly what’s expected of them: i.e., what the agenda is and what jobs need to be done to drive that agenda? Have they been given the needed tools and resources, and a chance to build the necessary skills and confidence to use them effectively? Are they surrounded by others (including the CEO) who are aligned on a common direction and who display the desired mindsets and behaviors? Is it clear what the consequences are if they don’t get on board and deliver? Resources Mentioned CEO Excellence: The Six Mindsets That Distinguish the Best Leaders from the Rest* by Carolyn Dewar, Scott Keller, and Vikram Malhotra The Hidden Life of Trees: What They Feel, How They Communicate - Discoveries from a Secret World* by Peter Wohlleben Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Create Team Guidelines, with Susan Gerke (episode 192) How to Sell Your Vision, with Michael Hyatt (episode 482) Your Leadership Motive, with Patrick Lencioni (episode 505) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
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The Starting Point for Inclusive Leadership, with Susan MacKenty Brady
2022/06/13
Susan MacKenty Brady: Arrive and Thrive Susan MacKenty Brady is the Deloitte Ellen Gabriel Chair for Women and Leadership at Simmons University and the first Chief Executive Officer of The Simmons University Institute for Inclusive Leadership. As a relationship expert, leadership wellbeing coach, author, and speaker, Susan educates leaders and executives globally on fostering self-awareness for optimal leadership. Susan advises executive teams on how to work together effectively and create inclusion and gender parity in organizations. She is the coauthor, along with Janet Foutty and Lynn Perry Wooten, of The Wall Street Journal bestselling book, Arrive and Thrive: 7 Impactful Practices for Women Navigating Leadership*. In this conversation, Susan and I discuss the reality that while we may intend well on inclusion, real change starts with us first. We explore how implicit bias assessments can be useful in discovering where they bias is that we don’t see in ourselves. Plus, we examine some of the key actions we can take on relationship building and repair in order to get better. Key Points Most of us intend well, but we often miss the opportunity to move from being an ally (alignment) to being an upstander (taking action in the moment). Utilizing an assessment can help us understand where our implicit biases diverge from our conscious thoughts. Curiosity and relationship-building isn’t just for the moment — it’s the before, during, and after of conversations to discover how we get better. When we make a misstep, move quickly and purposefully to repair the relationship. Resources Mentioned Arrive and Thrive: 7 Impactful Practices for Women Navigating Leadership* by Susan MacKenty Brady, Janet Foutty, and Lynn Perry Wooten The Inclusive Leader's Playbook by Susan MacKenty Brady, Elisa van Dam, and Loe Lee Project Implicit: Implicit Association Tests Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes What You Gain By Sponsoring People, with Julia Taylor Kennedy (episode 398) How to Build Psychological Safety, with Amy Edmondson (episode 404) How to Be More Inclusive, with Stefanie Johnson (episode 508) How to Reduce Bias in Feedback, with Therese Huston (episode 510) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
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How to Give Feedback, with Russ Laraway
2022/06/06
Russ Laraway: When They Win, You Win Russ has had a diverse 28 year operational management career. He was a Company Commander in the Marine Corps before starting his first company, Pathfinders. From there, Russ went to the Wharton School, and then onto management roles at Google and Twitter. He then co-founded Candor, Inc., along with best selling author and past guest Kim Scott. Over the last several years, Russ served as the Chief People Officer at Qualtrics, and is now the Chief People Officer for the fast-growing venture capital firm, Goodwater Capital, where he is helping Goodwater and its portfolio companies to empower their people to do great work and be totally psyched while doing it. He's the author of the book When They Win, You Win: Being a Great Manager Is Simpler Than You Think*. It’s the job of every leader to give feedback. In this episode, Russ and I discuss what to say and what to avoid when giving feedback. Plus, we explore how to think about truth and the most effective ways to start and close feedback conversations in order to help everybody move forward. Key Points Avoid spending too much time talking about the impending conversation and just have the conversation. Use language like this: “I think I’m seeing some behavior that I believe is getting in your way. Are you in a spot where you can hear that right now?” Use the framework of situation, behavior/work, and impact in order to organize your feedback. Invite dialogue by asking: “What are your thoughts about that?” Avoid framing feedback discussions around “the truth” — there are always multiple truths in every discussion like this. You are offering them what you see. Resources Mentioned When They Win, You Win: Being a Great Manager Is Simpler Than You Think* by Russ Laraway When They Win, You Win website Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes Three Steps to Soliciting Feedback, with Tom Henschel (episode 107) Three Steps to Great Career Conversations, with Russ Laraway (episode 370) How to Balance Care and Accountability When Leading Remotely, with Jonathan Raymond (episode 464) How to Reduce Bias in Feedback, with Therese Huston (episode 510) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
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How to Compare Yourself to Others, with Mollie West Duffy
2022/05/30
Mollie West Duffy: Big Feelings Mollie West Duffy is an expert in organizational design, development, and leadership coaching. She previously was an organizational design lead at global innovation firm IDEO. She’s helped advise and coach leaders and founders at companies including Casper, Google, LinkedIn, Bungalow, and Slack. She’s experienced in designing talent processes and systems, as well as organizational structures and behaviors, cultural values, and learning and development programs. She's written for Harvard Business Review, Fast Company, Entrepreneur, Quartz, and other digital outlets. She co-founded the Capital Good Fund, Rhode Island's first microfinance fund. She is the co-author with Liz Fosslien of the Wall Street Journal bestseller No Hard Feelings: The Secret Power of Embracing Emotions at Work and now their second book Big Feelings: How To Be Okay When Things Are Not Okay*. We’ve all heard the well-intended advice that we should not compare ourselves to others. In this conversation, Mollie and I explore why that's almost impossible to do and how we can cooperate a bit more with the inevitable and make our comparisons more useful. We highlight some of the key ways that comparison can help us and where leaning in may actually be useful in your own happiness and development. Key Points It’s a myth that the less you compare yourself to others, the better. Often, the opposite is true: we don’t compare ourselves enough. We tend to compare our weaknesses to other people's strengths. Finding ways to curate our inputs is often much more useful. Shifting from malicious envy to benign envy is helpful. Thoughts such as “I’m inspired by what they’ve done…” or “I haven’t done what they’ve done…yet,” can move us to a healthier place. We see the best of people on social media. It’s helpful to piece together the missing footage by comparing some of the nitty gritty. Compare present you against past you. Resources Mentioned Big Feelings: How To Be Okay When Things Are Not Okay* by Liz Fosslien and Mollie West Duffy How to Manage Your Anger at Work by Liz Fosslien and Mollie West Duffy Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes Four Steps to Get Unstuck and Embrace Change, with Susan David (episode 297) What to Do With Your Feelings, with Lori Gottlieb (episode 438) How to Reduce Burnout, with Jennifer Moss (episode 561) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
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Handling a Difficult Stakeholder, with Nick Timiraos
2022/05/23
Nick Timiraos: Trillion Dollar Triage Nick Timiraos has been the chief economics correspondent at The Wall Street Journal since 2017, where he is responsible for covering the Federal Reserve and other major developments in U.S. economic policy. He joined the Journal in 2006 and previously covered the 2008 presidential election. He wrote about U.S. housing markets and the mortgage industry as a reporter based in New York. His coverage included the government’s response to the foreclosure crisis and the takeover of finance companies Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. Nick is the author of Trillion Dollar Triage: How Jay Powell and the Fed Battled a President and a Pandemic -- and Prevented Economic Disaster*. Key Points Some of Federal Reserve Chair Jerome “Jay” Powell’s core skills have helped him navigate difficult stakeholders: He’s highly regarded as a good listener with excellent emotional intelligence. He’s intentional about creating strong teams and espoused the value of teamwork regularly. He is mindful of daily events, but is always playing the long game. He speaks in plain language that makes sense to many people, regardless of their education level. Specifically, four unwritten rules of dealing with a difficult stakeholder like Donald Trump emerged in Nick’s analysis of Jay Powell’s public appearances: Don’t talk about Trump. When provoked, don’t return fire. Stick to the economy, not politics. Develop allies outside the Oval Office. Resources Mentioned Trillion Dollar Triage: How Jay Powell and the Fed Battled a President and a Pandemic -- and Prevented Economic Disaster* by Nick Timiraos Nick Timiraos website Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Listen When Someone Is Venting, with Mark Goulston (episode 91) How to Handle a Boss Who’s a Jerk, with Tom Henschel (episode 164) The Way Out of Major Conflict, with Amanda Ripley (episode 529) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
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Help People Show Up as Themselves, with Frederic Laloux
2022/05/16
Frederic Laloux: Reinventing Organizations Frederic is the author of Reinventing Organizations: A Guide to Creating Organizations Inspired by the Next Stage of Human Consciousness*. The book is a global word-of-mouth bestseller with over 850,000 copies sold in 20 languages. Frederic’s work has inspired the founders of Extinction Rebellion, the Sunrise Movement, and Project Drawdown, as well as countless corporate leaders and faith movements. In a past life, he was an associate principal with McKinsey & Company. He's also the creator of the Insights for the Journey video series. In this conversation, Frederic and I explore a place where almost every leader can have a meaningful impact: helping people show up as their whole selves. We discuss how critical it is for leaders to lead the way in doing this — and how storytelling can be an important entry point. We look at some of the practical actions leaders can take to enter into a place of wholeness, including elevating beyond content, using everyday language, and integrating with the work at hand. Key Points As a leader, wholeness begins with you. Exploring wholeness yourself sets the stage for everyone else to be able to engage more fully. Rather than talking lots about wholeness, it’s often helpful just to begin modeling it. When you do, everyday language us useful to help others engage. Your personal history, the history of the organization, and the organization’s purpose are often helpful stories to share that open up a space for wholeness. You can turn any conversation into a moment of wholeness. One invitation for leaders is to stop talking about content and elevate the dialogue to “what’s happening” overall. Resist any temptation to disconnect wholeness from the work at hand. Bringing these together helps people to show up at work more authentically. Resources Mentioned Reinventing Organizations: A Guide to Creating Organizations Inspired by the Next Stage of Human Consciousness* by Frederic Laloux Reinventing Organizations: An Illustrated Invitation to Join the Conversation on Next-Stage Organizations* by Frederic Laloux Insights for the Journey video series by Frederic Laloux Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes The Way to Stay Grounded, with Parker Palmer (episode 378) How to Be More Inclusive, with Stefanie Johnson (episode 508) The Path Towards Trusting Relationships, with Edgar Schein and Peter Schein (episode 539) End Imposter Syndrome in Your Organization, with Jodi-Ann Burey (episode 556) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
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How to Pitch Your Manager, with Tom Henschel
2022/05/09
Tom Henschel: The Look & Sound of Leadership Tom Henschel of Essential Communications grooms senior leaders and executive teams. As an internationally recognized expert in the field of workplace communications and self-presentation, he has helped thousands of leaders achieve excellence through his work as an executive coach and his top-rated podcast, The Look & Sound of Leadership. In this conversation, Tom and I explore the sometimes awkward moment of needing to get buy-in from your manager on a next step, proposal, or funding. We detail three considerations and how attention to them can help you frame this conversation better. Plus, we share tactics such as making the business case, telling a story, and past interactions — in order to help you get forward movement. Key Points Three lenses of consideration are helpful when considering how to pitch you manager: purpose, preference, and protocol. When framing your purpose in making a pitch, it’s helpful to be able to change altitude. Consider “clicking out” on a map to frame the bigger picture. To be purposeful, make sure you are making the business case for whatever you are pitching. Anger and emotion can be sentinels that you might not have moved past thinking about it personally or framed the business context fully. Consider past interactions with your manager on how they prefer to receive information. The way you pitch them should begin with their preferences, not yours. Get intel in advance from other stakeholders, if practical. They can help you see the variables that might be clouding your judgement if you’re too close to the situation. Clearly frame the problem and examples of it. Consider strutting your pitch in the framework of The Want, The Obstacle, and The Resolution (see PDF below). Resources Mentioned Storytelling: A Three-Part Model by Tom Henschel (PDF download) Related Episodes How to Start Managing Up, with Tom Henschel (episode 433) The Way to Influence Executives, with Nancy Duarte (episode 450) The Way to Make Sense to Others, with Tom Henschel (episode 518) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
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Leadership When Others Know More Than You, with Bonni Stachowiak
2022/05/02
Bonni Stachowiak: Teaching in Higher Ed Bonni is the host of the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast, Dean of Teaching and Learning and Professor of Business and Management at Vanguard University, and my life partner. Prior to her academic career, she was a human resources consultant and executive officer for a publicly traded company. Bonni is the author of The Productive Online and Offline Professor: A Practical Guide*. Listener Questions Allison asked for resources on how to lead others who are more knowledgeable than you in the field of work. Everett wondered how he can navigate a situation where accents make it difficult to understand interview candidates. Stephen asked about motivating people independent of incentives. Resources Mentioned The Empowered Manager: Positive Political Skills at Work* by Peter Block Drive* by Daniel Pink Effective Delegation of Authority: A (Really) Short Book for New Managers About How to Delegate Work Using a Simple Delegation Process* by Hassan Osman The Coaching Habit* by Michael Bungay Stanier Humble Leadership* by Edgar Schein and Peter Schein HBO Max Presents Brené Brown: Atlas of the Heart Leading with Dignity: How to Create a Culture That Brings Out the Best in People* by Donna Hicks On the folly of rewarding A while hoping for B by Steven Kerr Related Episodes How to Improve Your Coaching Skills, with Tom Henschel (episode 190) How to Motivate People, with Dan Ariely (episode 282) The Path of Humble Leadership, with Edgar Schein and Peter Schein (episode 363) Effective Delegation of Authority, with Hassan Osman (episode 413) Start Finding Overlooked Talent, with Johnny Taylor, Jr. (episode 544) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
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The Path Towards Joy in Your Career, with David Novak
2022/04/25
David Novak: Take Charge of You David Novak is Co-Founder, retired Chairman and CEO of Yum! Brands, the world’s largest restaurant company with over 45,000 restaurants in more than 135 countries and territories. During his tenure as CEO, Yum! Brands became a global powerhouse, growing from $4 billion in revenue to over $32 billion. After retiring in 2016, he became Founder and CEO of David Novak Leadership, dedicated to developing leaders at every stage of life. David is also the host of the top-ranked podcast, How Leaders Lead and founder of the leadership development platform of the same name. An expert on leadership and recognition culture, David is also a New York Times bestselling author. His books include Taking People With You: The Only Way to Make Big Things Happen, O GREAT ONE! A Little Story About the Awesome Power of Recognition, and his latest book with Jason Goldsmith, Take Charge of You: How Self Coaching Can Transform Your Life and Career*. In this conversation, David and I discuss the importance of finding joy in our careers. David highlights several of the key questions that he utilizes when helping others to uncover how joy can show up their work. He encourages us to surface the single biggest thing that’s important right now in order to get immediate traction. Key Points Sometimes your best (and only) coach is yourself. Use joy as your destination finder. Find your joy blockers by asking yourself: what’s getting in the way of my joy? Your worst days often provide insight on this. Discover your joy builders by asking yourself: what would grow your joy personal and professionally? Your most memorable days are starting points for answers here. Your goal is to surface your single biggest thing. This changes over time, but ideally is only one thing, one at a time. That’s how you gain traction. Resources Mentioned Take Charge of You: How Self Coaching Can Transform Your Life and Career* by David Novak and Jason Goldsmith Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Find Your Calling, with Ken Coleman (episode 352) Align Your Work With Your Why, with Kwame Marfo (episode 542) How to Nail a Job Transition, with Sukhinder Singh Cassidy (episode 555) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
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How to Help People Engage in Growth, with Whitney Johnson
2022/04/18
Whitney Johnson: Smart Growth Whitney Johnson is CEO of the tech-enabled talent development company Disruption Advisors, an Inc. 5000 fastest-growing private company in America. As one of the top ten business thinkers in the world as named by Thinkers50, Whitney is an expert at smart growth leadership. She has worked at FORTUNE 100 companies, and as an award-winning equity analyst on Wall Street. Whitney co-founded the Disruptive Innovation Fund with the late Clayton Christensen. She has coached alongside Marshall Goldsmith, selected by him in 2017 as a Top 15 Coach out of a pool of more than 17,000 candidates. She is the author of Disrupt Yourself and the host of the podcast of the same name. She is also the author of Smart Growth: How to Grow Your People to Grow Your Company*. In this conversation, Whitney and I explore a big reality of growth; it’s often slow at the start. We discuss three practical steps that leaders can take for both themselves and others to stay engaged during the early stages of growth. Key Points Auditing some of your roles, secrets, beliefs, values, and boundaries will help you move forward along the growth path. Listen to the stories that others tell and help them link past experiences with what’s important today. Images are a critical entry point to growth. Utilize them in addition to the new behavior itself to begin to frame your thinking and identity. Circle back after receiving feedback and show others what you’ve learned from it and how it’s changed your behavior. That motivates them to stay invested. Use “I am” statements that have a noun rather than a verb. Instead of “I run,” consider saying, “I am a runner.” Resources Mentioned Smart Growth: How to Grow Your People to Grow Your Company* by Whitney Johnson Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Become the Person You Want to Be, with James Clear (episode 376) How to Motivate Leaders, with John Maxwell (episode 452) How to Win the Long Game When the Short-Term Seems Bleak, with Dorie Clark (episode 550) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
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Make It Easier to Challenge Authority, with Richard Rierson
2022/04/11
Richard Rierson: Dose of Leadership Richard Rierson has over 30 years of real-world, practical leadership experience as a United States Marine Corps officer, professional aviator, and corporate executive. His philosophy is that our leadership challenges should be met with the lifelong dedication and pursuit of becoming composed, confident, consistent, courageous, and compassionate. In addition to being a sought after speaker, coach, and consultant, he is the host of the highly acclaimed Dose of Leadership podcast. He's also a commercial airline pilot, currently flying as a first officer on the Boeing 787 Dreamliner. In this conversation, Richard and I explore how professional aviation emerged from the accidents of the 1970’s to improve challenging authority inside the cockpit. We discuss the principles of crew resource management (CRM) and how more structure and intention between crew members vastly reduced the number of aviation accidents. We examine what leaders can do to use similar principles to support appropriately challenging authority inside their organizations. Key Points Almost every accident is a chain of events. The key is to have self awareness in the chain and to interrupt it. Making the invitation to challenge before the work begins makes it far more likely that another party will speak up when they see something. Pilots use green, yellow, and red as simple and immediate indicator to others in the cockpit how much stress they are holding. Three steps are use to pilots to escalate challenging a more senior pilot: ask a question, make a suggestion, take control i.e. “my aircraft.” Resources Mentioned Sully with Tom Hanks The Crash of Flight 401, and the Lessons for Your Company by Dave Yarin The Evolution of Airline Crew Resource Management by Jean Dennis Marcellin Related Episodes The Way to Turn Followers Into Leaders, with David Marquet (episode 241) How to Deal with Opponents and Adversaries, with Peter Block (episode 328) How to Talk to People Who Have Power, with Jordan Harbinger (episode 343) How to Use Power Responsibly, with Vanessa Bohns (episode 551) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
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Podcast Reviews

Read Coaching for Leaders podcast reviews

4.8 out of 5
1086 reviews
Arlie K 2022/06/21
Inspiring and actionable!
Dave and his epic guests talk all things leadership, but it’s so much more than that! You’ll get tons of actionable advice and tangible tips, but you’...
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Trainer in training 2022/04/30
Insightful
Dave is insightful and thoughtful, and he is always prepared for his guests to maximize their time and ask the questions that we all want to!
Frank_TL 2022/04/12
“Must have” leadership podcast
If you’ve been looking for a podcast that gives you actionable insight and provides an exponential return on your investment of time, look no further....
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ckbmusik 2022/03/17
GREAT CONTENT!
This is been one of the most beneficial shows for me professionally. I learn so much. Thanks for the work you do.
Jay187528 2022/04/05
Not good
Was good right up until this last episode where race was brought up every other minute. Merit based not race based
Anita M K 2022/02/23
My favorite
This is my all time favorite podcast. I come back to it time and time again. It is smooth, relevant and has genuinely changed how I manage staff. I...
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Raerocks22 2022/02/17
Love this show!
Dave does a great job of explaining all concepts and giving examples. I would definitely recommend!
TK21LL 2021/11/03
Time Well Spent
Coaching for Leaders is a fine example of what a podcast should deliver to its audience. The topics are relevant, timely, and relatable. The guests ...
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Alexstrath1 2021/10/21
The best management podcast out there
I’ve heard Dorie interviewed on a bunch of shows now and this was the most actionable. The host, Dave, asks thoughtful questions that bring unique and...
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LoveMartins 2021/10/19
An excellent leadership reference
This is one of the staple podcasts that I listen to when I can. I am a nurse leader and a Mom of 3, and this podcast has helped me tremendously become...
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